Manon Ress's blog

In their own words: why they oppose the treaty to facilitate access and sharing of works for people with reading disabilities

Now that we know who are the people opposed to an international treaty to facilitate access and sharing of accessible formats of works for blind people and people with reading disabilities, let’s read what their arguments against the treaty are.

I was able to highlight 10 main arguments and you can check in their own words below if you do not believe me:

"Who on earth would oppose a treaty to facilitate access to information and knowledge to people with reading disabilities?"

I am often asked "who on earth would oppose a treaty to facilitate access to information and knowledge to people with reading disabilities?" Please read my selected quotes from the comments posted today on the Copyright office page here. But I would also like to highlight some really positive and supporting comments about the treaty. There are more of them than the negative ones but do they have the same weight?

The American Council of the Blind (ACB) & the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) comments on treaty for access

The American Council of the Blind (ACB) and the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) submitted their comments in response to a Notice of Inquiry put forth by the United States Copyright Office and the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). ACB is a leading U.S. consumer organization of blind or visually impaired individuals. Access to information is a critical area of interest for ACB, and expanding the availability of accessible format materials is viewed as highly beneficial to the blindness community in the United States and throughout the world.

LCA, EFF, and COSLA filed comments regarding the treaty to facilitate access and sharing for people with reading disabilities.

The Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) consists of the American Library Association, the Association of College and Research Libraries and the Association of Research Libraries.

Collectively, the ALA, ACRL and ARL represent over 139,000 libraries in the United States employing approximately 350,000 librarians and other personnel.

Benetech & Bookshare file with LOC and USPTO on WIPO treaty for reading disabilities

Today Benetech, a leading Silicon Valley technology nonprofit and operator of the Bookshare online library for people with print disabilities submitted comments to the US Copyright Office and the USPTO on the topic of access to copyrighted works for people with print disabilities. Here are the major points, the submission is attached at the end of this blog.

KEI, ICDRI, AHEAD, NYBIDA and Lighthouse file comments on WIPO treaty for reading disabilities

Today five groups filed the attached comments to the U.S. Copyright Office and the USPTO regarding the WIPO draft proposal to facilitate access to copyrighted works for persons, who are blind, have visual impairments and other reading disabilities in response to the Federal Register Notice of October 13, 2009.

The comments were signed by

  • Dr. Manon Ress, Knowledge Ecology International (KEI)

The ACTA Leak is useful, but there are still plenty of secrets

This is a note about the leaked ACTA documents, that have been reported now by several news organizations and bloggers.*

On September 30, 2009, the EU wrote a three page memo on the Internet chapter of ACTA. This is about a week after the USTR held a secret meeting with selected corporate lobbyists and lawyers to debate the ACTA Internet under terms of a tough non-disclosure agreement.

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and WIPO Treaty for Sharing Accessible Formats of Copyrighted Works

In a February 2009 article, I described why we need a Word Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) treaty for people with reading disabilities and why the US delegation at WIPO should support the WBU proposal and even become a leading force promoting it in its new form, a proposal by the governments of Brazil, Ecuador and Paraguay tabled at WIPO in May 2009.

Draft conclusions on Protection of broadcasting organizations

And these are the draft conclusions on the casting treaty. And a date for the next SCCR which might be changed because it is the same date as a WTO meeting in Geneva.

Protection of broadcasting organizations

16. The committee expressed its appreciation for the information session on developments in broadcasting which focused on concerns of developing and least developed countries

Draft conclusions re Audiovisual Performances

These are the draft conclusions regarding the audiovisual performances. The delegates had very few comments, so what you see here is more or less what the final paper will look like.

Protection of audiovisual performances

11. The Committee expressed its appreciation for the seminars organized by the Se. and encouraged the Sec to continue that activity

12. The Committee reaffirmed its commitment to work on developing the international protection of performances in audiovisual media.

DRAFT conclusions by the Chair re Limitations and Exceptions at SCCR18

These are the draft conclusions distributed by the chair regarding item 5 of the agenda (i.e. limitations and exceptions). The paper was distributed before the lunch break (1-3pm). The delegates are consulting on it and will come back at 3pm. The final text will be modified of course but this is a good start.

SCCR 18 DRAFT CONCLUSIONS OF THE SSCR prepared by the chair
Limitations and exceptions

KEI Comments on Accessible Works and Standards

Today I filed my comments to the United States Copyright Office and the United States Patent and Trademark Office on Accessible Works and Standards, a topic related to the provision of access to copyrighted works for blind or other persons with disabilities.

Notes from the protest: People vs Authors Guild on Kindle 2 text to speech

The following is my report from the April 7, 2009 Reading Rights Coalition demonstration in front of the NYC offices of the Authors Guild, regarding text to speech for Kindle 2.

Growing Opposition to the Authors’ Guild Request to Remove Text-to-Speech on Kindle2

The groups below represent 15 million Americans who cannot read print because of blindness, dyslexia, spinal cord injury and other print disabilities. Reading disabled persons affected by the Authors’ Guild request to remove the text to speech function on Kindle 2 include school children, the elderly, professionals, university students, returning veterans, and yes, your neighbors, family members and friends.

Who should benefit from a WIPO Treaty for Reading Disabled Persons?

This note discusses the issue of who should benefit from a WIPO treaty for reading disabled persons. Should it only be people who are blind and visually impaired, as some propose, or should it be more inclusive with regard to other disabilities?

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